The quiet revolution is getting louder

By Michael MacMillan, Computerworld Canada |  Networking

Compared to other, similar events, the tone was different. These officials outlined in a sober, methodical way how adopting wireless technology can save companies money. And they didn't gloss over the rough spots. They admitted that some roadblocks have yet to be ironed out, most notably a lack of enterprise-class support. However, they also pointed out that many pervious problems have been largely solved. The coverage is here. The devices are strong enough. Security is being addressed and, most importantly, the kinds of applications enterprises want to see are being built.

Also, wireless technology has demonstrated considerable resilience. In the wake of the post-Y2K spending slowdown, exacerbated by 9/11 and the meltdown of some service providers, survey after survey revealed that wireless projects were likely to be the first on the corporate-spending chopping block. But research analyst firm IDC says the market is hanging in there, and earlier this year forecast the worldwide market for wireless and mobile infrastructure consulting, integration and management services to rise to US$37.42 billion by 2006.

In the end, only you will decide whether the time for widespread adoption is here or not. But as we enter this revolution, it appears that this time all the players at least have their ducks in a row.
MacMillan is editor of ComputerWorld Canada. He can be reached at mmacmillan@itworldcanada.com.

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