Intel to cell phones: Can you hear me now?

ITworld.com |  Networking

Intel will have to cut the power consumption of the XScale core in order to run video encoding programs on 3G phones, Strauss said. The company announced at its Fall IDF conference last September that it will add MMX (multimedia extensions) technology to future XScale processors, and will likely build support for that instruction set to future releases of the PXA800F, he said. MMX technology is a collection of specialized instructions designed specifically for complex and computing-intensive multimedia applications.

The general processor on the PXA800F chip runs at 312MHz, while the DSP runs at 104MHz. Intel jointly developed the core of the DSP with Analog Devices Inc., Sheehan said. The chip was manufactured on Intel's .13-micron process technology, which uses the same techniques for about 90 percent of the tasks required to make both flash and logic chips, he said.

Each processor has integrated flash memory. The main processor uses 4M bytes of Intel's flash memory product, while the DSP comes with 512K bytes of integrated flash memory.

Intel is shipping sample volumes to potential customers as of Thursday. The PXA800F will be available in production volumes by the third quarter, and products with the chip are expected by the end of this year or early 2004. The chip costs US$35 in quantities of 10,000.

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