Unisys launches 'Business Blueprinting'

IDG News Service |  On-demand Software

Unisys Corp. on Tuesday announced Business Blueprinting, a service designed to help companies gauge the impact of changes made to their business processes and their IT infrastructures with the goal of increasing returns from IT investments, the company said Tuesday.

Frequent changes in markets and technologies mean corporations often need to alter their structures and business processes, which can involve making changes to critical IT systems, Unisys said in a statement. Customers can employ Business Blueprinting to create "digital models that link business processes to the software and systems that support them," the company said. Organizations can then better gauge how any changes they make would affect their IT infrastructures and their businesses, according to Unisys.

Companies should find they are able to eliminate several steps in their business processes by identifying what is redundant, and early clients have seen cost savings of up to 60 percent, the company said.

Unisys was due to describe the offering, which it said is supported by Microsoft Corp. and IBM Corp., in more detail later Tuesday at a press event in New York.

Unisys will employ Microsoft .Net development tools and its BizTalk server and Windows Server system for the service, it said, and will open Team Jupiter Lab, a workshop where developers can design applications using BizTalk Server 2004, Microsoft's upcoming e-business software code-named Jupiter, Unisys said.

The company will also work with IBM using its WebSphere integration products and Rational development tools, it said.

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