3GSM: IBM to ease business apps onto Nokia handheld

By , IDG News Service |  Mobile & Wireless

IBM Corp. and Nokia Corp. are teaming up to make it easier for enterprises to provide applications to their mobile workers.

Next-generation Nokia Communicator devices will include Wi-Fi wireless LAN capability, and a deal with IBM will provide for smooth handoffs of applications between carrier and enterprise wireless networks, the companies are set to announce Monday at the 3GSM World Congress in Cannes.

Developers in enterprises will be able to write applications using Java tools and have them run on different kinds of networks and even on successive generations of client devices, company executives said.

As Wi-Fi networks proliferate in enterprises and public places and mobile operators deploy increasingly fast cellular data networks, more capacity has become available for running enterprise applications on the move. However, keeping those applications running while moving among different types of networks is more complicated than finding the highest speed around. Nokia and IBM aim to make the experience seamless.

The technology will become available in the fourth quarter of this year when the Nokia Communicator 9500 hits the market. The combination cell phone and handheld computer, the next generation of a long line of devices from Nokia, will be joined by more Communicator devices in 2005, according to Nokia. The current Communicator 9210, like earlier models, is a phone that flips open to reveal a wide keyboard and LCD screen. The 9500 will be a sleeker version of the current model, said Scott Lindgren, director of product marketing at Nokia.

The tri-band GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) phone will support IEEE 802.11b wireless LANs as well as EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution), and GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) for data communications. It runs on the Nokia Series 80 software platform, which is based on the Symbian Ltd. operating system.

Developers at software vendors and in enterprises will be able to use a desktop Java Development Kit to extend their existing Java-based applications to the Communicator, which will come with Java 2 Mobile Edition Personal Profile runtime environment that enables integration of middleware, according to a statement by the companies.

On the device, WebSphere Everyplace Connection Manager Client will direct the application to the fastest available network. IBM's Lotus Sametime Instant Messaging Client software will run on the Communicator, so users can keep in touch with their colleagues wherever they are, the companies said. Their moves will be transparent to the application and to other users, said Eugene Cox, director of mobile solutions at IBM.

The network hand-off mechanism could allow enterprises to take their employees' data sessions off the mobile operator's paid network and on to the free internal Wi-Fi network without making prior arrangements with the mobile operator, Cox said.

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