More random thoughts: Municipal Wi-Fi and WLAN spectrum

By C.J. Mathias, Farpoint Group |  Mobile & Wireless

I've been working on another white paper on capacity management in wireless LAN systems. You can think of capacity management as kind of a system-wide extension to what happens in RF Spectrum Management (RFSM), a topic I covered in a white paper a while ago. Since then, I've been thinking about the need to control and manage wireless LAN systems from more of a macro perspective, something that becomes essential as (a) wireless LAN installations grow, and (b) dense deployments (see my last column on this) become the norm. Just like modern jet aircraft can't fly without the aid of dozens of microprocessors, the same is true for wireless LANs - manual control is no longer possible as an installation grows beyond a few APs. Anyway (I digress, as usual), the white paper on capacity management is almost done, and I'll have it for you shortly. I'm just checking one fact, and waiting for one last person to call me back. As an aside (here I go, more digressing), have you notice how busy everyone is today? It's funny, in a way, that wireless communications was supposed to make us more efficient and responsive, improving productivity, customer service, and even our quality of life. Now we find that many are essentially tied to their cell phones, and that workloads have grown to fill in all that free time we were supposed to have. We've pushed productivity, for many, to the breaking point, and I'm not sure we're still making progress. As I've often said, the sociology of wireless is much more important than the technology, and I'm sure you will be hearing more on this topic.

So, while I wait for my colleague to call me back (presumably on his cell phone), I have a couple more random thoughts for this week.

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