IBM fills out SOA product line

IDG News Service |  SOA

IBM Corp. introduced new products Tuesday that fill some gaps in its portfolio of software for integrating applications using the SOA (services oriented architecture) model.

The products include IBM's first take on an ESB (Enterprise Services Bus), a kind of software broker that manages interactions between applications to form a business process. It also announced some new services from IBM Global Services to help customers build SOAs.

SOA refers to a design model that can help businesses integrate applications more efficiently and update them without extensive recoding. The services are software programs that carry out particular tasks, such as checking a customer's credit history. They can be reused because they are built using standard interfaces, which these days are often based on the Web services protocols and languages, such as the Simple Object Access Protocol and Extensible Markup Language.

BEA Systems Inc., Sun Microsystems Inc. and Oracle Corp. are all pitching suites of software for building SOAs. A diminishing field of pure-play vendors, such as webMethods Inc. and Cape Clear Software Inc., also offer SOA products.

IBM has already announced several SOA products, and some of what it unveiled Tuesday are updated versions of existing products. It enhanced its WebSphere Business Monitor, for example, so that it can keep track of the performance of business processes made up of SOA applications.

Other products were new, and these are expected to ship in the coming month or two, IBM said. Pricing will be announced when they are released.

They include WebSphere Integration Developer, an Eclipse-based tool for writing programs that link SOA applications into a business process. IBM also unveiled two server products: WebSphere Process Server, for orchestrating a flow of business events, and the ESB.

While the Web services technologies are fine for linking two applications, an ESB makes it easier to manage interactions among several applications, said Tom Rosamilia, vice president for WebSphere worldwide research and development. "If I hook up services A, B and C to the bus, I only have to make three connections and the bus then handles the transformation of all the protocols to let any service talk to any other service," he said.

Other companies have already rolled out ESBs. Cape Clear was quick to accuse IBM of "jumping on the bus" Tuesday. It thanked IBM for "validating" the ESB market but said its "hodgepodge" of individual SOA products, which are all part of its WebSphere brand, take too long to figure out and install.

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