Mobile TV content a must, says Sony Pictures Digital VP

IDG News Service |  Mobile & Wireless

Even if mobile TV is still in its infancy and poses numerous technical and legal hurdles, major production studios don't want to miss out on the action.

"There are many stumbling blocks to bringing content to mobile devices," Bill Sanders, vice president of mobile programming at Sony Pictures Digital Inc., said Tuesday in an interview on the sidelines of the Mobile Video & Television Summit in London. "But there are also a lot of opportunities."

Sanders, who has worked for a few of the big Hollywood studios, referred to the recent deal between The Walt Disney Co. and Apple Computer Inc. as a "wake-up call" for studios still undecided about mobile devices as a new distribution channel for their content.

In October, Apple cut a deal with the ABC television network to make five popular shows from ABC network, which is owned by Disney, available for download on the U.S. computer company's new video player iPod.

"Since then, every major studio in Hollywood has done some sort of reorganizing to give mobile devices greater focus," he said.

Historically, studios have been reluctant to cannibalize their cinema business, according to Sanders. "Thirty years ago, they fought home video to protect their theater seats," he said. "But now home video is a booming business and together with cinema, is generating more revenue for the studios than ever before."

Not only mobile phones and devices, but all other types of digital devices, including memory cards and UMDs (Universal Media Discs), are now on the radar screen of the studios, according to Sanders. "Digital technology has changed the business model for studios almost completely," he said.

Currently, Sony Pictures Digital has an agreement to deliver content as part of a video-on-demand service to the Italian mobile operator H3G SpA, a subsidiary of Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa Ltd.

A special feature of that service is what Sanders calls the "pause-and-resume" function. "Many mobile TV critics have questioned whether people want to watch a long movie on their mobile phone," he said. "I say, yes, they do but not all at once. They want to watch in intervals."

The "pause-and-resume" function, while new to mobile phone content, isn't entirely new in the film industry, according to Sanders. When viewing films at home, Howard Hughes, the billionaire airplane builder and filmmaker, who owned his own network, "used to tell his engineers to pause when he wanted to go to bed," he said.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Mobile & WirelessWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question