NYSE launches VMware-based cloud for financial firms

By , Network World |  Cloud Computing, finance, NYSE

The New York Stock Exchange has built a VMware-based cloud computing service for financial firms, which goes live today from a data center in New Jersey with expansions planned for Toronto, Tokyo and London.

Known by the catchy moniker "Capital Markets Community Platform," the cloud will be similar to infrastructure-as-a-service offerings from Amazon and Rackspace. But the NYSE and VMware said it will be unique in specifically targeting financial services customers, while offering robust security, access to NYSE market data, and minimum computing requirements to avoid performance problems.

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Although virtualization performance has become acceptable for many mission-critical workloads, the NYSE's Feargal O'Sullivan says the stock exchange primarily sticks with bare-metal servers for the majority of its own latency-sensitive applications. That won't be the case in the cloud service, but O'Sullivan said the performance should be robust enough for many types of transactional services, market data analysis, quotes and trading applications.

NYSE's cloud customers must buy a minimum of a half a terabyte of storage and 96GB of RAM, with no more than one virtual machine allowed for each 8GB of RAM. That basically guarantees there won't be more than one virtual machine per CPU, preventing performance problems, says O'Sullivan, vice president of platform development for NYSE Technologies. Still, customers who measure performance in terms of microseconds may find the service not fast enough, so the NYSE also offers a separate service with dedicated hardware.

"They might test in the cloud and deploy on bare metal, which is why we're offering both," O'Sullivan says.

The NYSE cloud uses VMware, along with EMC VNX storage and HP blade servers. While this isn't the first time NYSE has offered computing services to other financial firms, it is the NYSE's first cloud service with virtualization and a self-service provisioning system, which uses VMware's vCloud Director software


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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