BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 review: An enterprise evaluation

By , CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BlackBerry PlayBook, tablets

The PlayBook was blasted last April after it was released without an email app, and though it took RIM nearly a year, the company has finally filled in that gap--and filled it in quite nicely. ActiveSync support could also significantly change the way administrators secure and manage BlackBerry devices in the future.

PlayBook Native Email and PIM

I found the native messaging app, which not only lets you add mail accounts but also connect to social networks like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, to be both functional and easy to use, thanks to its intuitive interface. Mail setup was extremely easy for me for both corporate Exchange mail and my Gmail Web mail. I simply entered in my Exchange login information and was connected without any issues; same for my Gmail.

The PlayBook mail app offers a variety of connection options for mail, calendar and contacts, including the popular Web mail services such as Gmail and Hotmail; Exchange ActiveSync; IMAP; POP; CalDAV; and CardDav, so most users and admins should have a similarly smooth setup experience. Adding VPN profiles was also a breeze; you just type in Server address, gateway type, user names and logins, etc., and you're good to go.

By default, the inbox shows you messages from all of your linked accounts in one place, but the "Accounts" function lets you see choose specific corporate/Web mail/social connections accounts to see only those messages or communications.

The native contacts and calendar apps are also vastly improved compared to the BlackBerry Bridge apps available via the previous version of RIM's PlayBook software, especially when you consider that those apps were only available to BlackBerry smartphone users who connected their handhelds to the tablet via the BlackBerry Bridge app.

The contacts app is impressively full-featured, with cool new functions that let you check any upcoming appointments with a contact from within the app; find shared meetings; discover social connections you may have in common; and more. And it automatically pulls in contacts from all of your connected accounts to help populate your address book.

The calendar application is similarly well-designed, with valuable features for business users. It syncs dates and appointments with your connected accounts so, for instance, you can choose to display all of your Facebook connections' birthdays. You can easily switch the calendar view to day, week or month, and when you select a specific day, the calendar lets you view the day's events by the hour, by agenda items or by the contacts that you're set to meet with.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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