BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 review: An enterprise evaluation

By , CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BlackBerry PlayBook, tablets

The native PlayBook email app also looks very different than the BlackBerry Bridge mail app, and features and functionality are located in different places. This is not ideal for PlayBook users who employ the native app for personal mail and Bridge for corporate mail, since those users will be constantly switching back and forth between the two. It would have been nice if RIM considered congruity with Bridge when it developed the native mail app.

As for the PIM apps, I really like the layout and general functionality of the contacts app, but I wish it didn't pull in all of my Twitter and Facebook contacts, since some of them, especially my Twitter contacts, aren't personal friends or acquaintances, and their listing just gets in the way of my legit contacts. This contacts auto-population feature could be valuable in some instances, but you should have more control over which social contacts appear in your address book.

PlayBook Android Player

I really like the new BlackBerry Runtime for Android Apps feature, a.k.a., the PlayBook Android Player, and it works quite well in my experience. However, I've yet to find more than a handful of quality Android apps via BlackBerry App World, which greatly diminishes the value of the feature. (On the other hand, I have found quite a few cool Android apps that you can "sideload" onto the PlayBook.)

RIM ran a promotion that gave developers a free PlayBook for repackaging their Android apps for distribution via BlackBerry App World, but the promo resulted in few worthwhile Android apps in App World. This issue isn't Android-specific, or Playbook-specific; it's a problem for the BlackBerry platform as a whole. BlackBerry's lack of apps from major software makers and other organizations--including three out of leading professional sports leagues in the United States--makes it hard to feel confident in the future of BlackBerry or to sink your cash into a PlayBook tablet.

Apps aren't everything; if they were, I think RIM would be hurting even more. But the Android Player has a ton of potential to boost the overall PlayBook and BlackBerry 10 app catalogue, and I think RIM needs to find a better way to tap that potential. One way would be to remove or address some of the restrictions that keep all Android apps from being compatible with the Android Player.

BES and BlackBerry Mobile Fusion


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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