How to get the most from your 3D HDTV

You can perform a few simple tricks to optimize your 3D HDTV viewing.

By Timothy Seppala, PC World |  Personal Tech, 3D TV, HDTV

Gamers, tech enthusiasts, and early adopters were the first to benefit from the shift to HDTV, and now they're reaping the rewards of jumping on the 3D train before everyone else. Good 3D TV programming and Blu-ray movies are still in short supply, but the amount of killer stereoscopic games is growing by the day. In fact, some of last year's biggest games came with support for 3D television sets. But just as in the early years of HD technology, discerning how to get the most out of your cutting-edge tech is no simple task.

We're here to help. If you took the plunge and bought a cutting-edge 3D HDTV, spend a bit of time to implement the following simple tricks, which will help you improve your 3D HDTV viewing.

Use a Backlight

Whether you're playing games or watching Blu-ray movies, you'll probably be using your HDTV in a darkened room to replicate the immersive theater experience, but marathon sessions in front of a bright screen can wreak havoc on your eyes. With 3D activated, most 3D HDTVs run brighter to compensate for the tinted eyewear that makes the 3D effect possible. Prolonged exposure in a darkened room can exacerbate headaches and mental fatigue, but you can fix this glaring issue pretty easily.

The quick and cheap way to improvise your own backlight is to set up a desk lamp behind your HDTV with the bulb pointed at the wall. If you're really dedicated to the idea, buy a specialized bias lighting device such as the Ideal-Lume to backlight your 3D HDTV with complementary colored lighting, which keeps your display from being the only light-emitting object in the room. An inexpensive bias lighting product will cost you about $50 to $75.

Backlighting helps maintain image quality by providing a neutral reference point, and it reduces eyestrain because your pupils don't have to dilate and contract rapidly to accommodate quick flashes of light on screen as they would in a pitch-black room.

Calibrate Your Display


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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