Samsung Galaxy S III: review roundup

The Samsung Galaxy S III reviews are mostly glowing with some critics unhappy with the plastic shell. Read the roundup!

By Daniel Ionescu, PC World |  Mobile & Wireless, Amazon, Android

A PhoneArena review also mentions the S III's bulkiness, despite its thin profile. "You'll definitely have to forget about the comfort of using it with one hand only. But that's the way it is with this new breed of Android superphones. If you want to have a giant touchscreen, then you'll have to put up with having a giant phone."

Sharif Sakr at Engadget also gave top marks to the S III's camera, but notes that the HTC One X might be a better choice when it comes to "a much better user interface that sticks more closely to the guiding ethos of Android 4.0." As with previous iterations of the phone, Samsung uses its TouchWiz UI on the S III, and also added some useful features such as swiping contacts to call or message them, and less useful gimmicks like S Voice -- an iPhone 4S Siri look-alike which Sakr said "doesn't work as quickly or as intelligently, and it often cuts you off mid-sentence, thereby wasting time interpreting meaningless fragments of requests."

Pocket-lint's Chris Hall said "there is a lot to love about the Samsung Galaxy S III" he reviewed. "The huge display, the power, the smooth and fast operation are all to its credit. Add to this the ability to change battery and expand storage and you've a very good package indeed." But he notes that the display could be brighter (the battery-saving feature seems to dim the display a bit too much) and the UI can be a bit cartoony in places.

Gareth Beavis at TechRadar thought the S III's design is "very sleek and the weight is minimal too -- and battery life borders on the stellar at times." "If the Samsung Galaxy S3 had landed with a premium metallic shell, in the same vein as the HTC One S for instance, any question of design standards would have been obliterated." Overall though, Beavis ranked the S III as "the best smarpthone on the market. It's got every kind of feature we could ask for and more, and raises the bar once again in terms of what consumers should be expecting in terms of battery life, processor speed and media management."


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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