CheatSheet helps you find and remember keyboard shortcuts

By Dan Frakes, Macworld |  IT Management, cheat sheets

On the other hand, if you use keyboard shortcuts frequently, KeyCue still has a lot to offer over CheatSheet. For example, KeyCue also shows systemwide shortcuts and can even display those shortcuts in a separate overlay. If you press any other modifier key, such as Shift, Option, or Control, while viewing the shortcut overlay, KeyCue highlights shortcuts that include those keys. You also get options for grouping submenus, for including or excluding shortcuts in the Apple and Services menu, for choosing the layout and theme of the KeyCue overlay, and for choosing which display hosts that overlay if you have multiple screens. Finally, some apps—such as those from Adobe—provide keyboard shortcuts that, because of how those apps are coded, neither CheatSheet nor KeyCue display; KeyCue lets you manually add shortcuts to be displayed in a particular app’s listing, and the developer’s KeyCue extras page lets you download sets of non-standard shortcuts you can import.

But for those who don’t need KeyCue’s many extras, it’s great to have a simpler, lower-cost option, and CheatSheet will be all that many people will need.

[Dan Frakes (@danfrakes) is a senior editor at Macworld.]

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Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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