Lumi uses sunshine to print images onto clothes

The Lumi process utilizes the power of the sun to print images onto fabric.

By Jacob Siegel, PC World |  IT Management, kickstarter

Have you ever taken a picture so stunning that you wish you could show it off to the world? Well walking around with a framed picture is not only inconvenient, but also likely to drive away all your friends.

So put that six foot frame down and get out a monochromatic shirt, because the people at Lumi have created a new way to print your favorite pictures on fabric.

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Being coined as the Lumi Process, this print technique uses sunlight to emblazon an image on anything from clothing, to furniture, to a burlap sack. The process begins by taking a picture with your smartphone and turning it into a black and white negative using the Lumityper app. The negative then needs to be printed on transparent film. Apply Inkodye, Lumi's proprietary water-based dye, to the fabric on to which you plan on printing. Pin the film on top of the fabric, take it outside, and let it sit in the sunlight for about 10 minutes. Voilà¡ Now you can share your amazing image with the world.

The current Kickstarter campaign is actually the second one that's been done by this group. The first campaign funded research on the project along with the growth of the company. Now the group wants to share the tools that will allow everyone to use the Lumi Process with as little hassle as possible.

The money raised will allow Lumi to ship out starter kits to interested customers looking to try out textile printing. The main draw of the Kickstarter project is the Lumi Printing System, a $70 package that has all the necessary equipment to get started with textile and natural material printing. Act fast if you're interested--there are only 4 days left before funding is complete!

[The Lumi Process via Kickstarter]

Jacob Siegal spends a vast majority of his time surrounded with and invested in technology and media, so he decided he may as well start writing about them. You can find more of his writing at Game Rant and his topical tweets @JacobSiegal.

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Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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