Apple iOS 6 review: A worthwhile upgrade

iOS 6 has now evolved into a robust and powerful mobile OS.

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, Apple iOS, ios 6

The Camera app received some interface tweaks, most notably the darker theme prevalent throughout iOS 6. On the iPad, the Options and Camera Toggle buttons have been moved to the lower menu bar, and the shutter has been relocated to the center right, which is closer to where a thumb naturally rests when taking pictures on the tablet.

But by far the most important addition is the new Panorama mode (which is only supported on the iPhone 4S, the iPhone 5 and the fifth-generation iPod touch).

To take a panorama photo, tap Options -- it's located in the upper center of the screen -- and tap Panorama. The interface will display a rectangle with an arrow indicating in which direction to move your phone. When you tap the onscreen shutter button, the iPhone starts filling in your panorama as you slowly pan the camera along. You can even turn the phone on its side and pan up or down. The resulting high-quality panoramas can be enormous, but the shots themselves are lovely. According to Apple, panorama photos can take up to 28 megapixels, so be mindful of your storage.

The shot was taken using the new Panorama mode

Safari

The first thing that stood out when I opened Safari is the new Reader button in Safari's address field. Just like Safari on the Mac, activating Reader enables a text-only view of webpages, stripped of ads, multiple pages and other distractions. The result? A nicely formatted, text-only reimagining of the article you're reading. It's in this mode that you can really see the Retina display in action: The result is like reading a high-quality, back-lit magazine.

Activating Reader mode in Safari gives you a text-only view of webpages, stripped of ads, multiple pages and other distractions.

In Reading mode, you can only scroll up and down through the story. A stationary title bar remains at the top of the screen, allowing quick access to font size changes and to a Sharing Sheet for quick sharing with friends.

The other big change is Reading List. Although this was introduced in iOS 5 as a way to save articles for later reading, iOS 6 adds a handy offline mode. Using iCloud, stories you save in Reading List are available for offline reading on your other devices and on Macs running OS X Mountain Lion.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Consumerization of ITWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question