How Good Technology is opening new doors with NFC-enabled Samsung smartphones

By , CIO |  Mobile & Wireless, Good Technology, Near Field Communications

Physical-access credentials (HID's Corporate 1000 credentials) for each pilot participant were then sent wirelessly to the appropriate users' device via the HID Secure Identity Service, which also lets IT admins manage and monitor credentials and identities tied to specific devices. Next, an HID Mobile Keys app was installed on appropriate devices. That app communicates with the secure microSD cards and pulls the appropriate credentials for building access when the user needs them.

"You can push and revoke the credential over the air," Webber says. "We're just piloting this in one small area, but if we move to the whole office or to multiple officesour office in Dallas, for exampleit's possible to provision a credential to me when I'm traveling that, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week, will get me into the Dallas office, but then pull it back when I leave.

"IT could manage where I can go at what time, and I don't have to remember to bring multiple things. In the future, I imagine this will be something like a calendar invitation. When I accept, my credentials are pushed to me appropriately and when I leave they're gone."

As part of the pilot, Good also used the Samsung smartphones to access the office of the company's SVP, Special Markets, Michael Mahan. Mahan travels frequently, and other Good staffers use his office when he is gone for conferences and meetings.

Good had a SARGENT SE LP10 lock installed on the Mahan's office door, which integrates with the company's physical access system, to allow pilot participants to use NFC credentials to enter the office. The system also allows Mahan to grant access only to the users who should have access, specify the times those staffers can access the room and run reports to see who used the office and when.

Webber said the smartphones adds a layer of security to the physical-access process, because users not only need an actual badge or credential, they need to know the password to unlock the device. From a user perspective, that added step may add some time, but in the long run, mobile-phone-based physical access could actually save corporations, and their employees, time, according to Webber.

"I didn't feel slowed down much by it at all. It's easy to forget my badge, after a long weekend or after traveling, because it's not part of my routine to bring it," he says. "Nobody in the pilot, including myself, forgot the phone because it's their phone. If I forget it, I'm going to go back and get it. The speed comes from the fact that I'm never slowed down or inconvenienced by reaching a doorway and not being able to get through it [because of a forgotten phone]."

Good Technology started with just 10 pilot participants, but that number has more than doubled to about 25 participants, due largely to the interest the pilot attracted, according to Webber.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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