How Microsoft blew its Windows 8 launch keynote

One day before Microsoft's new operating system goes on sale, the company hosted an event to launch its newest OS in style..

By Melissa J. Perenson, PC World |  Windows, Microsoft, windows 8

Microsoft's Windows 8 launch event Thursday could have been a barn burner. The locale, Pier 57 in New York City, is grand, if cavernous. And the occasion itself came preloaded with import: Microsoft would be publicly unveiling its most important operating system since Windows 95.

And yet, Microsoft's big day to shine--one year in the making--fell flat.

That's not a reflection on Windows 8, Microsoft's biggest OS refresh since 1995. Nor is it a referendum on Surface RT, the first piece of computing hardware that Microsoft has ever developed, manufactured, and branded on its own. No, the launch party fell flat because Microsoft shared so little new information about Windows 8 and its greater, sweeping ecosystem.

We saw hardware, but no hardware surprises. We saw apps, but no new titles. We came for drama, but received something more akin to an infomercial.

Steven Sinofsky, president of the Windows and Windows Live Division at Microsoft, opened the launch event, positively giddy that the new Windows era was finally upon us. The dramatic changes inside Windows 8--with its live-tile, touch-friendly interface--make the new OS a very different computing experience. And the gravity of up-ending the basic Windows experience wasn't lost on Sinofsky. "So many rely on Windows in so many ways," he said. "We're humbled by that responsibility."

The changes are so dramatic that later in the event, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer noted that "Windows 8 should leave no doubt that we've shattered your perception of what a PC is, and how alive they all are with activity."

That's a heady statement. But Thursday's event was short on data that could add fresh perspective to the same-old, same-old we've been hearing about Windows 8 since Microsoft showed off the consumer preview in February at Mobile World Congress. This time around, we needed to see less splashy video, and more details about how Microsoft expects consumers to adapt to the sweeping changes introduced in Windows 8. We needed to see evidence of how Microsoft plans to educate consumers on the new touch gestures, and, most important, what we should reasonably expect from the new Windows Store, the single purchasing point for new Windows 8 apps.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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