Nexus 10 review: The so-so Android tablet

Google's Samsung-made 'pure' Android tablet simply doesn't match up in quality or experience to Samsung's own Note 10.1

By , InfoWorld |  Mobile & Wireless, Android, Android tablets

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Android 4.2 "Jelly Bean": More misses than hits in its new featuresThe Nexus 10's claim to fame is Android 4.2 "Jelly Bean," an update to the Android 4.1 "Jelly Bean" release introduced in June's Nexus 7 and now making its way to Android devices from other manufacturers. Android 4.2 adds four software features to tablets.

The handiest is the ability to have multiple user accounts on the tablet. You switch user accounts at the lock screen that appears when you start the tablet or awaken it, much as you do in OS X or Windows. Each user has a separate instance of Android, so parents and kids don't get in each other's way; in a business scenario, personal and work personas could be kept separated.

Android 4.2 also lets you place some widgets, such as email or calendar, on your lock screen. (Each user account can have separate widgets; tap the user account bubble first to determine which account gets the added widgets.) The process is not intuitive. You have to swipe to the right on the lock screen to activate the widget box, then slide the widget box to "rotate" until a + (plus) icon appears, and finally tap the + icon to add a widget. You can have as many as four widgets, but you can add them only one by one.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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