Get started with the iPad and iPad mini

By Serenity Caldwell, Macworld |  Personal Tech, ipad, ipad mini

If you've purchased content that hasn't been copied to your computer (say, if you're using Amazon Cloud Drive), you should be able to download it to your desktop system, or, at the very least, install an app on the iPad (like the Kindle app for book purchases) that lets you access the information.

Apps and miscellany: If you're moving from another tablet with a different OS, you unfortunately can't port any of those apps to your iPad. On the upside, you may be able to find parallel versions on Apple's App Store (for instance, if you're using Dropbox on your smartphone or Android tablet, you can download the company's iOS app and continue to access your Dropbox data). If you have apps with valuable information you don't want to lose (notes apps, to-do lists, and so on), you can poke around to see if there's any way of exporting that information; otherwise, you'll be out of luck.

Activate your iPad

If you purchased your iPad in the Apple Store, you may have already activated it with a Specialist by your side. But if you've received your new gadget as a gift, or you opted not to activate immediately, here's a guide on how to do so.

Set Me Up: To begin the activation process, slide the switch to the right.

Once you've unboxed your iPad, turn it on by pressing the On/Off switch. A welcome screen greets you, displaying a Slide To Set Up slider in a variety of different languages. (If you need quick access to your device's IMEI or ICCID number without setting up the device, you can tap the information button [represented by a lowercase i] located directly above the slider.)

Users with visual impairment can also take advantage of iOS's VoiceOver screen-reading system during the setup process by triple-clicking the Home button.

To begin the activation process, slide the switch to the right, where you're asked to pick your language, country, and if you'd like to enable Location Services. This allows Apple apps (and third-party apps) to access your location via Wi-Fi networks and your Global Positioning System (GPS) location.

Your iPad will check for any Wi-Fi networks in the area that you can connect to; unfortunately, if it doesn't find any, you'll have to set up your iPad via iTunes and the computer.

Restoring old data to a new iPad


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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