How to return your gadget gifts without any runaround

Unhappy with a gift or other seasonal tech purchase? Here's our advice for hassle-free returns and exchanges, online and in person.

By Anne Kandra, PC World |  Personal Tech, gadgets

December may be the season of giving, but January is the season of returning. Unfortunately, returning that not-quite-right gift can be tricky. With so much shopping happening online these days, it isn't always clear where to turn--plus, you have to deal with packing, shipping, and other details. And if you don't have a receipt, sending back electronics and tech gear can be particularly complicated, as it's often burdened with restocking fees and other annoying restrictions. Here are a few tips to ease the hassle of returning tech products.

If you don't want to keep it, don't open it: This is especially important for electronics. Even if your entire family is waiting for you to rip into your new Kindle Paperwhite, keep the box sealed if you plan to use the credit to get a Fire 4G. The return process will be much smoother if the item is snug in its original, sealed package.

If it's open, repack it: Keep all of the original packaging and repack carefully, with accompanying accessories, documentation, and other components, in their original condition.

Time is of the essence: The holidays are busy for everyone, but don't put off making that return. Most retailers have time limits for returning holiday gifts--especially gifts purchased on Black Friday or through other promotions. Procrastinate, and you might be too late.

Check the receipt: In an ideal world, every giver would tuck a gift receipt discreetly under the bow. In the real world, of course, that's probably not going to happen. If you can't bring yourself to ask the giver for a paper trail, find out where the item came from and research that retailer's return policy. Some require a receipt or another proof of purchase; others are more lenient. Be aware, though, that stores willing to accept returns without a receipt typically offer only direct item-for-item exchanges, or perhaps store credit; they may also balk at taking back certain items that have been opened. And if the item's price has dropped since it was purchased, you'll likely get credit for the lower price.

Try to go in person: Most retailers that have both online and brick-and-mortar stores let you return items purchased online to a physical store, to avoid shipping costs and hassles. Check with the retailer before you make the trip, however, as many have exceptions for specific types of items (such as electronics), or for catalog or Internet-only items.

Bring your ID: Some retailers, including Best Buy, now re--quire an ID before processing a return. The goal, they say, is to prevent fraud and to keep track of "serial returners."

Retailer Return Policies

Policies are subject to change, so check before you return.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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