IT decision-makers say embrace BYOD or be left behind

By Thor Olavsrud, CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD

The report found that 32% of respondents had a much more nuanced definition: "The BYOD movement is about much more than managing devices--it's about users, how they do their jobs and the degree to which organizations empower them to achieve maximum productivity--regardless of device or location."

A majority of organizations (61%)with a mature BYOD program say that is precisely how they see BYOD. But when the respondents as a whole were asked whether it is more important to manage users or devices when it comes to BYOD, 56% said it is more important to manage devices. Yet, Vanson Bourne's research suggests that organizations that adopt a device-centric approach are likely to face more setbacks and challenges, including abuse of policies and unauthorized data distribution, than organizations that take a user-centric approach.

"At Quest Software [now part of Dell] we closely followed the BYOD trajectory within our own organization and moved quickly to empower our employees by giving them access to the apps and data they need, regardless of device," says Carol Fawcett, CIO of Dell Software. "Instead of managing individual devices, we chose to manage the identities of our user base--from the moment an employee enters the organization to the moment they leave--regardless of which device they use, or where they use it from."

"When we looked across our worldwide customer base, we discovered that when organizations took a similar user-centric BYOD approach, they were able to reap the greatest and most immediate rewards while experiencing the fewest setbacks," she adds. "These companies used BYOD as a strategic competitive advantage and also were able to resolve some of the biggest BYOD problems, including security, access rights and data leakage."

User-centric BYOD Shows Host of Benefits

Companies that adopted a user-centric approach were much more likely to report the following benefits:

The ability to link and manage devices per user

The ability to track and support each user's level of mobility

The ability to deliver applications based on a user's role

The ability to effectively provision devices and required applications when users change roles, leave or buy new devices

The ability to track and manage users (and their data) when they change roles or leave the company

The ability to separately manage employees' business and personal data

The ability to back up all the data on an employee's personal device

The ability to adhere to governance regulations

They also cited these advantages of a user-focused approach:

Enables more flexible working hours for employees (77%)

Allows them to gain more creativity from employees (73%)


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question