BlackBerry Z10 in-depth review: Good phone, truly great OS

BlackBerry's new smartphone has a superior display and navigation, making it a device worth checking out.

By , Computerworld |  Mobile & Wireless, BlackBerry, blackberry 10

That capability is something other smartphone OSes hope to achieve, but BlackBerry 10 already excels at this priority threading capability, judging by the performance I witnessed.

Starting up and getting around

The BlackBerry 10 uses a full range of gestures to access its comprehensive range of features. But even before you start swiping, you have to power up the Z10, which, unfortunately, I found especially off-putting. Over several tries, it took me an incredible 71 seconds on average from the time I pushed the power button until a home screen of applications appeared.

That average boot time was easily more than twice as long as it takes me to power up and boot the Samsung Galaxy S III running Android Jelly Bean 4.1 or the iPhone 5 running iOS 6.1. Admittedly, many users will only power up once a day, or even less, so maybe this won't become a showstopper.

Experienced smartphone users will find the Z10 intuitive and easy to use, and training wizards will help first timers. For example, you swipe down from the top bezel to access application settings and swipe up from the bottom bezel to minimize an opened app.

When setting up a BlackBerry ID and password, I was tickled to find that I could see the characters I was typing into a password field (rather than a series of asterisks) by tapping a little eyeball icon. I constantly have to retype passwords to get them right, so this is a welcome mini-feature.

BB10 has a standby home screen that is pretty spare, with date, time, new message count and a camera icon in the lower right that you tap and hold until the camera launches. The home screen has the camera icon as well.

You wake up the smartphone from standby by swiping up from the bottom bezel to go to the home screen. On the bottom there are three virtual keys inside a black bar that show the phone, universal search and the camera icon; above that, a screen of application icons are arranged with four icons across and four down.

Touch the search icon to access the universal search functions; you can use typed messages or do a voice search (by pushing a button on the side of the phone). I was amazed at how well my voice commands worked right from the very start.

Just above those three keys containing universal search are a row of small dots that let you navigate through various app screens; according to BlackBerry, there is no limit to the number of screens. You just swipe left or right to go to the next screen. The new BlackBerry Hub is at the home screen to the far left and the Active Frames grid is second to the left.

Just about everybody at BlackBerry has been espousing the virtues of Hub for most of the past year, calling it "a central and distinguishing feature of BB10" in promotional materials, so I was eager to test it out.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Mobile & WirelessWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness