Why Microsoft and Dell should team up on tablets

Dell is going private with the help of $2 billion from Microsoft. What does this mean for them, and the future of the PC industry?

By , PC World |  Hardware, Dell, Microsoft

With the launch of its Surface tablets, Microsoft ventured into new territory and stepped a little on the toes of its equipment-manufacturing partners. While the engineering and quality of Redmond's tablets has been almost universally praised, they are priced higher than expected, and sales so far appear to be disappointing.

I asked Onuora Amobi, editor of Windows8Update.com, for his thoughts on what customers can expect from the Dell-Microsoft partnership. "What the deal should mean for users of both companies products is higher levels of innovation, lower prices, sleeker and sexier looking products...Microsoft and Dell should focus on making signature Surface-type products that are well made and get the attention of both consumers and the enterprise."

Other industry observers disagree that the two companies should team up on something like the Surface. Nevertheless, Dell has tried a variety of tablet concepts, but none have been as compelling or innovative as the Microsoft Surface tablets. With access to Dell's intellectual property, supply chain, and distribution channels, new models could go from concept to market much faster, and Dell with Microsoft could bring Surface tablets to the masses at a more affordable price.

We'll have to wait until the new private Dell is official, and even then only time will tell, but the Dell-Microsoft union has a lot of potential to help both companies reinvent themselves.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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