Long buyout battle could erode customer confidence in Dell, analysts say

Michael Dell needs to get his privatization deal done quickly to avoid harming his business

By , IDG News Service |  

With Michael Dell still battling to get his US$24.4 billion buyout deal approved by shareholders, his company needs to avoid a long, drawn-out battle that could erode customer confidence.

Dell will soon provide details about any counteroffers to the proposed purchase by Michael Dell and equity investor Silver Lake, who have offered $13.65 per share to take the company private. The deal was announced Feb. 5, and Dell is in the final day of its "go-shop" period in which other parties can make counteroffers.

There have been signs the proposed deal could fall apart, with some big Dell shareholders, including Yacktman Asset Management and Southeastern Asset Management, opposing the buyout on the grounds that it undervalues Dell.

Some counteroffers seem to be in the works, with equity firm Blackstone Group having approached Southeastern Asset Management and TPG about possible alternative bids, The Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. Blackstone is said to have also approached Mark Hurd, the former Hewlett-Packard CEO who now works for Oracle, about running the company, according to a report by Bloomberg.

The current offer by Silver Lake and Michael Dell included a $2 billion loan from Microsoft, and debt financing commitments from Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, Barclays, Credit Suisse and RBC Capital Markets.

After the go-shop period ends, Dell will file documents with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission giving its shareholders a chance to examine any alternative offers and their risk factors, said James Post, professor in management, markets, public policy and law at Boston University.

The documents will give shareholders a chance to ensure there is no deception and that there are no better offers on the table than the proposed $24.4 billion deal. Shareholders are usually looking for the highest price for their shares.

It's clear that some shareholders won't back the current deal because they think there's not enough money on the table. "They could go back and forth through several rounds," Post said. "It could be settled in as little as 30 to 60 days. It could be much longer than that."

The deal could get tied up as Dell and dissident shareholders make their cases to shareholders about specific offers, and each maneuver could take months, Post said. There may even be legal proceedings, which would take up even more time, Post said.

Some shareholders will lose money on the current deal, and Dell may end up spending more to win them over, something it clearly wants to avoid, Post said.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question