How Samsung can save Windows 8 tablets

Samsung is the hero that Windows 8 tablets need but don't deserve.

By Armando Rodriguez, PC World |  Mobile & Wireless, tablets, Windows 8 tablets

Windows 8 tablets aren't in good shape: Microsoft's OS gets plenty of hate for its desktop functionality, and many people aren't willing to pay premium prices for the ability to run Office--and not much else--on what amounts to be keyboard-less PCs.

Indeed, with Windows 8 and Windows RT making up just 7.5% of the total tablet market, many manufacturers are fleeing what they perceive to be a sinking platform. It looks really bad, right? Not so fast. At Thursday's big Samsung event, the Korean tech giant might have just thrown Microsoft the life-preserver it needs to help keep Windows tablets in the game.

Here are three ways Samsung can lend Microsoft a helping hand.

Solving the software problem

After announcing another handful of Android smartphones (all with the name "Galaxy S4" and whatever noun Samsung decided to tack onto the end), the company surprised those in attendance by unveiling two new slates running Windows 8: the Ativ Q and the Ativ Tab 3. The Ativ Q is the more noteworthy of the two for its ability to seamlessly switch between Windows and Android, giving it access to a whole mess of software normally unavailable on Windows 8 devices.

One of the key problems with Windows 8 and Windows 8 RT (and Windows Phone 8 too, for that matter) is the lack of mobile-optimized software available for the platform. Windows 8 has the benefit of being able to run full-blown desktop applications like Photoshop and Steam, but these software heavyweights aren't all that useful if you're on the go and don't have a mouse and keyboard plugged into your tablet.

But by allowing the Ativ Q to dual-boot into both Windows and Android, users can enjoy apps made specifically for mobile while still having access to a full desktop environment. Granted, not all Android apps are winners, but at least Samsung is providing options for people who don't mind wading through a bit of junk to find a few gems. It's also possible that Samsung would create custom software for the Android side of the Ativ Q, something to help it further stand out from other Android and Windows slates.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Mobile & WirelessWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question