Microsoft to acquire Nokia's mobile phone business

Nokia will focus on network infrastructure, mapping and locations services and technology development and licensing

By , IDG News Service |  Mobile & Wireless

Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion).

Image credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Microsoft is to acquire Nokia's Devices & Services business, which includes the smartphone and mobile phones businesses, and license the Finnish company's patents for a total of €5.44 billion ($7 billion) in cash, the companies said Monday.

The Redmond, Washington, software company will pay €3.79 billion for "substantially all" of the Devices & Services business and €1.65 billion to license Nokia's patents at the close of the transaction.

Nokia CEO Stephen Elop will be coming back to Microsoft and lead an expanded devices team, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said in an email to employees. Microsoft said it will draw on its overseas cash resources to fund the transaction.

At a news conference in Espoo, Finland, on Tuesday morning Ballmer hammered home the importance of the deal for Microsoft.

"Today's announcement is a bold step into the future. For Microsoft it's a signature event -- a signature event! -- in our transformation. We think this is a win-win for employees; win-win for shareholders, and win-win for customers of both companies. Through our partnership we have already accomplished so much, and yet clearly the opportunity ahead is remarkable. And I am incredibly optimistic about what we can achieve together," Ballmer said.

He also underlined Microsoft's plans to keep its mobile activities in Finland.

"We have no significant plans to shift around the world where work is done. ... Finland will become the hub in the center for our phone R&D, and we are counting very much on the incredible talent of Nokia employees to be a key part or driving and propelling Microsoft forward," Ballmer said.

Building on the partnership with Nokia announced in February 2011 and the increasing success of Nokia's Lumia smartphones, Microsoft aims to accelerate the growth of its share and profit in mobile devices through faster innovation, increased synergies, and unified branding and marketing, it said in a statement.

Nokia has been building smartphones around Microsoft's Windows Phone operating system in a bid to boost flagging market share, besides focusing on feature phones for emerging markets.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Mobile & WirelessWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness