Will Distributed Denial of Service Attacks Mean the Death of E-Business? -- CIO Sound Off -- January 2001

By Martha Heller, CIO |  Security

So many major sites have been downed by distributed denial of service attacks -- Microsoft most recently -- that I decided last week to ask Sound Off readers whether DDOS attacks could threaten the future of e-business. While every respondent disagreed heartily with argument that DDOS attacks do pose a threat (some sending me personal emails to poke holes in my argument), the column did spark some interesting dialogue.

From a group that regularly calls into question the ability of law enforcement agencies to keep up in cyberspace, it was surprising to hear how much confidence readers have in their power to keep the Internet secure.

"While DDOS attacks are commonplace today, more sophisticated law enforcement and advances in software and hardware which will make these attacks less successful should provide for relatively reliable E-business opportunities in the future," wrote a reader. "The malicious few who believe they can remain anonymous and are thus encouraged to conduct such attacks will find that they cannot continue to hide and get away with these obvious illegal activities."

"As the technology gets better and the punishments for cybercrime get harsher, the Internet terrorist groups will become fewer and smaller," wrote another. "Like the brick and mortar world, these groups will become known to officials and monitored on a regular basis."

Some readers argued that not only will e-business survive DDOS attacks, it will profit from them.

"DDOS attacks are only another great opportunity for Cisco, Microsoft and Exodus, for example, to team up and create truly reliable networks to secure data and maintain 99.9% client uptime. I would pay a premium for services like that," wrote a reader. "Security has never stopped business from moving forward. Back in the 1800's trains, covered wagons and stage coaches were attacked by various entities trying to deny service to remote parts of this country. Those DDOS attack spawned the proliferation of Pinkerton, county Sheriffs and hired guns. Soon, we'll see the Internet Pinkertons."

"Insurance companies will simply generate a new product for e-businesses to cover losses during internet attacks," wrote another. "They'll make a fortune on this new type of policy."

Other readers were less optimistic about the impact of DDOS attacks on e-business. While no one predicted e-business's demise at that hands of DDOS attacks, some readers displayed concerns over its continued growth.

"DDOS attacks will certainly slow the growth of e-commerce since the publicity will cause the potential users to have one more 'fear' to doing web business," wrote a reader. "It's probably also going it impact the small and mid-sized ISPs and ASPs. These smaller companies will be thought of as not having adequate resources for security and may be avoided."

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

SecurityWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question