MIT economist defends Microsoft

www.computerworld.com |  Business

WASHINGTON -- Microsoft Corp.'s defense in its antitrust trial yesterday
revisited the argument that it has not hurt consumers by giving away its browser
software and integrating it into its Windows operating system.

In U.S. District Court here yesterday, Microsoft's defense team called its last
rebuttal witness, economist Richard Schmalensee, dean of the Sloan School of Management
at MIT. Schmalensee, who testified earlier in the trial, reiterated that Microsoft's
actions have led to better and cheaper browsers and computing platforms.

The MIT economist answered a series of questions posed by Microsoft's lawyer that
were designed to counter the recent testimony on behalf of the government by
Schmalensee's colleague at MIT, Franklin Fisher.

The U.S. government has argued in its case against Microsoft that the company's
decision to make its browser part of Windows 98 has limited choice and thus hurt
consumers.

"There is no evidence at all that their actions have harmed consumers," Schmalensee
said. In fact, he said, Microsoft's actions have fostered many improvements. There are
better browsers available today than in 1995 when Microsoft's Internet Explorer began
shipping, and those browsers now cost nothing, he said. The integration of Internet
Explorer in the Windows 98 operating system has made it a better product and had
minimal effect on its cost, he added.

Asked by Microsoft attorney Michael Lacovara whether the browser war was over,
Schmalensee said it was absolutely not over. He also maintained that threats to
Microsoft's hold on the platform market include the emergence of the Java programming
language and operating environment, and also the merger of America Online Inc. and
Netscape Communications Corp. and the merged company's alliance with Sun Microsystems
Inc.

Schmalensee is expected to be on the stand for the remainder of the week.

Fontana is a senior editor at Network World.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question