Users trust information on the Internet

By Meghan Holohan, InfoWorld |  Tech & society, Tech & society

According to the results a study released yesterday by the UCLA Center for Communication Policy, many of the Internet users surveyed said the Internet is a more important source of information than either radio or television.

The UCLA Internet Report found that 67.3 percent of the study's Internet users think that the Web is an "important" or "extremely important" source of information, while 53.1 percent of those surveyed ranked television and 46.8 percent ranked radio at the same levels.

"The fact that the vast majority of Americans who use the Internet consider it an important information source -- even though it has been commonly available for only a few years -- vividly demonstrates how this technology is transforming the political process and the knowledge of voters," said Jeffrey Cole, director of the UCLA Center for Communication Policy and head of the World Internet Project, which includes the UCLA Internet Report.

Most Internet users -- about 73.1 percent -- said they think books are more important sources of information than the Internet is. Internet users ranked newspapers second, with 69.3 percent reporting that they're important information sources; the Internet was ranked the third most important source of information.

Non-Internet users ranked the Internet as the least important source of information, with only 25 percent saying it's an "important" source of information.

Some Internet users (35.7 percent) and almost half of non-Internet users (45.7 percent) said that only "about half" of the information on the Internet is reliable.

"About half -- 52 percent -- said most of the information is reliable and accurate. Basically, people are skeptical about what they can believe in what they're reading [on the Internet]," said Michael Sumuna, research director of the Center for Communication Policy.

He said that people seem to have a realistic approach toward what they find on the Internet. The wide publicity of Internet publications like the Drudge Report, which is reputed to be reliable only part of the time, has led people to carefully evaluate the information they get from the Internet, he said.

Both Internet users and nonusers agreed that there are risks in going online -- 63.6 percent of Internet users and 76.1 percent of nonusers either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement, "People who go online put their privacy at risk."

The results released yesterday are part of a longitudinal study the center is conducting with 2,000 individuals. In October, the rest of the study will be released. That information will be the first full set of results reported from the year-to-year study, which is cross-culturally studying how the Internet affects and changes people's lives.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Tech & societyWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question