Upstart wireless ISPs battle with radio waves

By Jim Geier, ITworld.com |  Networking

If you have an existing system experiencing interference, try tuning the transmitters
to different hopping sequences (for FHSS) or operating channels (for DSSS).
If that doesn't solve the problem, then you could try redesigning the layout
of the system to avoid the source of interference. If possible, try relocating
your central transmission site and repeaters to higher ground in order to improve
the signal power received by your customers.

As part of planning the implementation of a wireless ISP or private wireless
metropolitan network, you'd better consider the risks of interference. Is it
likely that someone else will install a wireless metropolitan network within
the same area? If a "yesanswer to this question is even a remote possibilitythen ensure you have enough of the optimum transmitter sites in area so
that future competitors will as little impact possible.

To significantly reduce interference, you should also consider the use of the
newer 5.8 GHz,
802.11a
point-to-multipoint products that will become available toward
the end of 2002. In addition to higher performance (54 Mbps using href="http://www.csdmag.com/story/OEG20010122S0078">OFDM), 802.11a operates
in the roomier 5.8 GHz band and offers the use of 12 noninterfering channels
in the same area. This provides much more capacity than 802.11b implementations,
which minimizes the potential for interference among wireless systems.

Stay tuned! Next time, we'll discuss ways to support higher performance requirements
of densely populated end-user environments.

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