'The job you've always wanted is just a click away!'

By Gerry Crispin, ITworld.com |  Career

The reality

  • Convenient? Not when I have to return to the site, post my password, and
    drill through the ads to get to the so-called "job of a lifetime." Why not just send me
    all the information about the job (including the contact information)? The reason I
    have to jump through all these hoops is a simple matter of Web economics: every time
    I'm forced back through the job site, I'm counted as a unique visitor and my page views
    will be added up to bolster the numbers that site claims. (Of course, the higher the
    page views, the more the site can charge for banner ads or job listings.) This wouldn't
    be so bad for someone only registered at one site; increasingly, however, job seekers
    are exploring major hubs, IT career networks, niche specialty sites, and local sites
    for places they can gain an edge. The last thing a candidate wants is to get emails
    from 10 sites that say nothing but "come back and build up our traffic." If you've got
    the goods, deliver it.

  • Easy? I'm hard pressed to see any difference between submitting a
    résumé and registering to receive jobs that match my interests. Passive
    candidates will be less likely to answer all these questionnaires: they're too
    intrusive, they're too long, and they're unnecessary. All the site really needs from an
    applicant is an email address and an indication of location and skill level. At least
    give me the short form as an option.

  • Accurate? I want New Jersey. I get Syracuse, N.Y. I'm looking for a programmer
    analyst position but am offered a help desk support job. I get one great match out of
    10 in a two week span and then, when I return to the site and search manually, I find
    twelve other positions posted during the last week with the same criteria I set my
    agent to search on.

  • Confidential? The only thing confidential on too many sites is their privacy
    policy; when I can find it, it usually reads like our insurance policy. I don't read
    insurance policies. What I want is assurances that my personal information is not being
    sold or used for other purposes, and that when my contact information is provided, it
    won't be released. Despite my efforts, a suspicious number of third-party recruiters
    still reach me thinking I'm a programmer analyst. I just tell them I really wanted the
    help desk job.

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