Who needs it?

By Rawn Shah, ITworld.com |  Development

Windows 2000 marks a big change in direction for
Microsoft's business-class platform. The focus of the new generation is to
more easily support large-scale networks of users and computers. Microsoft
hopes this new version will eliminate criticisms about the poor
performance of Windows NT in the enterprise arena. A major part of the
company's efforts was directed at enabling the OS to run better on larger
servers and at supporting more memory and faster and more complex
peripheral devices. Windows 2000 has made improvements not only in the
type of hardware it can support, but also in the number of features it has
added. Microsoft says that, with the new features, the OS can scale across
the platforms in your enterprise, from desktops to workstations to
workgroup servers and enterprise servers alike. Furthermore, its
improvements will make managing the system easier.

Microsoft's
claims aside, are the new features useful to you now? If so, will you need
to change your current environment to take advantage of them? How
difficult are they to implement? And what effect will they have on
existing systems? With these questions in mind, we'll explore a number of
Windows 2000's purported advantages.

Management and remote
administration

Microsoft Management Console MMC
consolidates all the administration tools in Windows 2000. It incorporates
both new and existing management tools into a single interface that covers
every aspect of the system. And once you adjust to how MMC works, you will
find that it has incorporated the earlier tools into the system so that
they operate very much as they did before. This keeps things familiar for
the administrator and makes it easier to improve the interface for
management, event logging, and report generation. In addition, some
administrator tasks can, in a simple way, be delegated to lower-level
administrators or less-privileged operators. By giving you easier access
to all the administration tasks, this unified tool can reduce the amount
of time needed to solve

problems.

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