Built to scale

By Mark Leon, InfoWorld |  Software

But many online retailers have not. Retail success online hinges on what happens behind that fabulous Web site: logistics and fulfillment, payment systems, systems and policies to handle returns, customer service, and, running through it all, integration. Without these the site won't scale, and customers who once loved the Web store will quickly turn fickle and point their browsers elsewhere.

This monstrous problem involves multiple technology and business issues, which is why many online retailers are outsourcing logistics, fulfillment, and customer service functions. Still, others figure that if you want something done right, you had better do it yourself. For example, Webvan, an online market, in Foster City, Calif., that currently operates in San Francisco and Atlanta, employs a system of highly automated distribution centers owned by the company.

The company's strategy isn't cheap. One Webvan distribution center costs $35 million; the company has two in place now and plans to have five in operation by the end of the year, according to Gary Dahl, vice president of distribution at Webvan, who says this ambitious rollout doesn't make him nervous.

"Construction of these distribution centers is the drumbeat that sets the rhythm for everything I do," Dahl says. "We planned for it since the very beginning."

Hollis Bischoff, vice president for e-business strategies at Meta Group, in Los Altos, Calif., says that if Webvan succeeds, the company will transcend the grocery business.

"They [Webvan] are engaged in the war to the door," Bischoff says. "Their real competitors are not other online grocers like Peapod, but the delivery giants like FedEx and UPS."

Dahl agrees. "In the long run, these [FedEx and UPS] are our real competitors," he says. "There are probably only a few players that customers will really trust to take that last step across the threshold. And who do you trust more than the person who handles your groceries?"

Chicago-based Peapod takes a slightly different approach. "We do supermarkets on the Web and plan to stick to that," says John Furton, CIO of Peapod.

Nevertheless, Peapod, like Webvan, wants to own as much of thee supply chain as possible and has made a significant investment in integrating its Web site with back-end systems.

But unless your company has deep pockets, such do-it-yourself models are hard to emulate. Fortunately, other options exist. For example, Soundwaves.com, a music retailer in Houston, chose an outsourcing strategy.

"We had a static Web site that didn't really do anything," says Alex D'Eath, IT Manager at Soundwaves. "We were trying to find a way to sell CDs all over the world."

Soundwaves turned worldwide operations over to Globalfulfillment.com, a company in Sunnyvale, Calif., that specializes in providing fulfillment services to online retailers.

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