Get Win4Lin and Windows users won't feel disenfranchised under Linux

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The rest of the installation was pretty straightforward. Win4Lin copies your Windows CD to the hard drive, and you install Windows 98 fresh from there. The only thing that caught me by surprise was the fact that I needed a Windows boot floppy as part of the process.

Windows 98SE under Win4Lin has some limitations. Although all your TCP/IP-based Internet applications will work fine, you won't be able to do any Windows networking. That means you can't use Windows printers, use the network neighborhood, or map network drives. You can, however, mount network resources using Linux and then assign them to drives for use by Windows. So you can usually duplicate whatever drive mapping you normally do in WWindows by playing some tricks with Linux.

Win4Lin also has a tricky way of making just about any Linux printer -- including remote printers -- appear as a special hardware port to Windows. Unfortunately, I'm experimenting with the new Common Unix Printing System, so I wasn't able to fully test the capability of printing to my network printer.

You can download the Win4Lin 2.0 beta and use it free for 75 days. Win4Lin is reasonably priced at $59 for the download, and $89 if you want the CD-ROM and a manual. If you really want to migrate to Linux but you'll feel disenfranchised without your Windows productivity applications, Win4Lin is a must-have.

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