Efficient Networks: leading the DSL charge into the enterprise

By Michael Vizard, InfoWorld |  Networking

Floyd: If you look at it from the service provider [perspective], you could come in and offer wireless long distance and local data all in one package to the businesses. Then what happens is that if you leverage a CLEC to get that one copper loop, you don't have to pay that access charge, which is equivalent to almost 50 percent of the rates, to the ILEC. The alternative carrier saves a lot of money by not having to pay access charges as much. The user saves a lot of money because he doesn't have a lot of monthly recurring costs on multiple lines, plus his rates will probably be lower, and he gets a bundled service, with everything on one bill. So it's pretty competitive from the competitive carrier. And from the ILEC's viewpoint, if you have an area in which you have copper exhaustion, such as Southeast Asia or Europe and some places in the United States, and you have a fully deployed central office so you can't pull any more lines off that CO, you can use voice over DSL to offer multiple lines to customers over one physical copper pair.

InfoWorld: So what's the next big challenge?

Floyd: We're going to have to allow our service providers, like an SBC or a Covad or an IXC, to offer the same services to their customers over a DSL loop as they do in a leased-line loop. I think that's one of the biggest challenges we have. I also think you're going to see this branch out into some other new technologies. I think you're going to see wireless come into play, along with other advanced services. We've got to keep our eye on the ball of the market and stay ahead of it.

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