Cisco unveils broadband access for multitenant buildings

By Stephen Lee, InfoWorld |  Networking

CISCO SYSTEMS IS pushing an ambitious plan to expand service to the in-building broadband market.

On Tuesday, the networking giant unveiled its Long-Reach Ethernet (LRE) technology, consisting of a set of devices that promises to deliver high-speed Internet connectivity to multiunit buildings such as hotels, apartment complexes, factories, and hospitals over existing voice-grade lines.

Customers will be able to purchase speeds of either 5Mbps, 10Mbps, or 15Mbps, and Cisco claims that the technology can send data over distances of 3,500 feet, 4,000 feet, or 5,000 feet, respectively. The products are scheduled for an April launch.

The LRE system will offer broadband speeds over any grade of wire, regardless of whether it is structured or unstructured, dedicated to data or responsible for carrying voice traffic.

"Building managers want to use the same infrastructure they already have, and 90 percent of the world is wired for voice, not data, said Shah Talukder, marketing director for Cisco's in-building broadband group. "We're trying to take a 20th-century infrastructure and provision 21st-century services."

Lower installation costs could make LRE an attractive option for buildings that are too old or too large to be wired for high-speed bandwidth. The solution could also be used in dispersed environments, such as college campuses, in which digging trenches for fiber cable is not financially feasible.

Cisco claims that LRE will also extend cost savings to ISPs. "Deployment, installation, site service provisioning, and ongoing maintenance are critical costs for service providers," Talukder said. "LRE helps them save costs in every part of the chain" because the system can be deployed quickly.

LRE will be compatible with ADSL (Asymmetrical DSL), which will allow service providers to deploy LRE to buildings that already have broadband access. At the same time, spectral compatibility with VDSL (Very high bit-rate DSL) gives Cisco a foothold in the growing VDSL market.

The LRE system will be powered by three hardware components: a switch, CPE (customer premises equipment) device, and POTS (plain old telephone service) splitter.

The switches, which are identical to Cisco's current Catalyst 2900 switches, apart from new LRE ports, can be daisy-chained to other switches, and the CPE device can be managed remotely over the Web.

As part of the LRE package, Cisco is also rolling out its optional Building Broadband Service Manager (BBSM) management software, which the company hopes will "let service providers make a business out of LRE," according to Ben Gibson, LRE senior product manager.

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