Microsoft to unveil management application at Networld+Interop show

By Jack McCarthy, InfoWorld |  Networking

MICROSOFT PLANS TO lay out its systems management strategy road map and unveil a performance monitoring application at next month's Networld+Interop conference in Las Vegas, according to officials at the Redmond, Wash.-based company.

Microsoft users were first shown a glimpse of the new application, dubbed Microsoft Operations Manager 2000, or MOM, in early March at the company's Systems Management Server & Windows 2000 User Conference.

MOM, which is based on technology licensed from partner company NetIQ, is designed to monitor the performance and availability of servers and applications, including Windows 2000 and Exchange Servers, SQL Servers, IIS Servers, and Active Directory, according to Microsoft officials.

Cliff Reeves, Microsoft's new vice president of marketing for the Windows.NET Server product management group, will outline the company's management strategy and show a demonstration of MOM at a Microsoft event on Monday, May 7, at N+I.

Microsoft Operations Manager is a complementary offering to the company's Systems Management Server, officials said. Microsoft developers saw need for a product designed to specifically address monitoring and performance analysis. MOM and SMS target different scopes of management and are designed to work in cooperation, said Microsoft program manager Wally Mead, at last month's conference.

Features of MOM include automatic discovery and deployment of managed nodes, automated alerts, and the ability to generate responses via rules. Enterprises also can set up customized alerts by adding in their own company-specific information to the application, according to presentations at the user conference.

According to one analyst, although Microsoft has historically been associated with its desktop products such as Word and Office, in recent years it has turned significant attention to the development of server-based applications.

"As Microsoft develops more server-based applications, the need to manage these Microsoft server-based applications becomes stronger," said Tim Grieser, director of research for enterprise management systems at IDC.

The MOM initiative, he said, "Is Microsoft taking a larger role in system management than they have previously. It might be a signal to the industry that Microsoft is becoming a larger player in systems management than they had previously."

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