Linux lights up enterprise; concerns loom

InfoWorld |  Operating Systems

"We are not giving these [middleware] products away to distributors. We expect to make good money from it, and I think the distributors will too," said one high-ranking IBM executive.

Teaming with other companies may also help Linux vendors ramp up service offerings. IBM bolstered the services business for Linux when it announced it would dedicate $300 million to the cause in the next three years. The funding will enable its Global Services business to offer additional or better services to help users bootstrap a Linux environment or to better integrate it with their existing ones.

Vendors serve up a plateful of Linux

Proof of Linux's readiness for mission-critical environments was demonstrated by some of the industry's bigwigs at the LinuxWorld Expo in New York last week.

Palo Alto, Calif.-based Hewlett-Packard Co. introduced a number of Linux management solutions. One, Service Control Manager, will offer a fivefold increase in performance when managing a Linux network, HP officials claimed.

Showing off Linux's scalability, Houston-based Compaq Computer demonstrated the stability of the operating system running on a cluster of its ProLiant servers.

Meanwhile, addressing the dependability of Linux in a mission-critical environment, Austin, Texas-based Dell Computer demonstrated an IA-64 stack running a data-intensive banking application on Linux, which required the use of Java on a 64-bit Itanium processor. The demo was created in conjunction with Austin, Texas-based Tower Technology, a maker of high-performance Java solutions.

IBM was also on hand to show that Linux has a bright future in high-end computing, announcing at the show that this spring it will deliver a 64-way Intel-based server with its NUMA-Q technology layered on top. The system, called the eServer x430, runs the new Linux Application Environment, which is designed to meet enterprises' demand for Linux applications scaled to handle growing e-commerce business.

Finally, Transmeta Corp., maker of the Crusoe processor, was also at the show to discuss improvements in the Mobile Linux OS and Crusoe's capability of operating without a hard drive.

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