Novell upgrades Single Sign-on

By Paul Ferrill, Network World |  Networking

Keeping track of multiple passwords for different systems is a pain. In fact, it ranks near the top of the list for most help-desk-related calls. Add to the mix myriad Web sites and applications requiring another set of credentials, and you're just compounding the misery. Novell has updated its Single Sign-on (NSSO) product and partnered with Passlogix to help ease the pain of application access for end users and administrators.

For users, NSSO eliminates the hassles of remembering multiple passwords and reduces the security risks associated with writing them down. For network administrators and help desk personnel, NSSO will reduce the number of calls from users who have forgotten their passwords.

NSSO sits on the client workstation watching for applications or specific Web sites requiring authentication. It then fills in the required information by retrieving the correct password from the user's Novell Directory Services (NDS) account. This version does a much better job of handling the whole password modification process than previous versions and provides additional controls for the administrator to govern how and when to make the appropriate changes. It also provides access to your password information even when you' re not connected to the central server.

NSSO Version 2.0 ships with a product called v-GO from Passlogix, which provides all the necessary features for managing Web and application passwords. NSSO Version 1.0 had a limited number of applications that it supported natively, including Lotus Notes, Entrust security applications and PeopleSoft applications. Support for any other application required additional user programming. The basic version of v-GO adds support for up to five Web logons and an unlimited number of Windows applications.

A new NDS-aware screen saver eliminates one more user name/password pair for the end user to remember and will make many security managers happy. While Windows NT server and workstation employ a user's logon credentials for the screen saver utility, Windows 95 and 98 use a separate pair. NSSO modifies the display properties dialog box for screen saver password configuration to reflect this change.

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