Does AT&T’s Sponsored Data violate net neutrality rules?

aiden

AT&T is planning to allow companies to pay for the data used by their apps so that it won’t count towards users monthly data limits. It seems to me like this would violate net neutrality standards. Am I missing something? This seems the very definition of treating some data differently. How does this NOT violate net neutrality?

Topic: Business
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jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

AT&T's Sponsored Data is bad for the internet, the economy, and you
http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/6/5280566/att-sponsored-data-bad-for-the-...

"If AT&T can levy taxes on access to a hundred million subscribers who are increasingly turning to mobile devices over traditional PCs, that turns the wireless behemoth into major economic gatekeeper on the internet — a situation that would flagrantly violate the net neutrality principles that govern landline internet but were waived for mobile. That was a huge policy mistake, and now we're paying the price.

The smartphone revolution was all about escaping the stifling and restrictive control of the carrier walled garden for the freedom of the internet. With Sponsored Data, AT&T is trying to put those walls back up."

henyfoxe
Vote Up (6)

Brilliant move by AT&T. Create data caps so that you can charge your customers when they go over, and monetize it so that you make more profit even when customers aren’t going over.

 

I think that they are going to run into some problems with the FCC over this. I certainly hope so, anyway. 

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