How will Yahoo's decision to end telecommuting affect wider adoption of the practice?

ttopp

One of the trends of the past decade has been a slowing increasing of the acceptance of telecommuting. Working from home is home is not for everyone or every company, but it works well for some. Do you think Yahoo's decision to ban telecommuting after having previously embraced it will have a wider impact on the acceptance of the work-from-home model?

Topic: Business
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jimlynch
Vote Up (12)

I doubt it will have any effect in a larger sense. Telecommuting has too many advantages for the right workers and companies.

I think it was a mistake for Yahoo to stop it wholesale, instead of focusing on the less productive workers.

I wrote a column a while back that explores the benefits of telecommuting:

No Telecommuting Allowed!
http://jimlynch.com/2009/11/19/no-telecommuting-allowed/

"Ever since my full-time gig as Community Manager for Ziff Davis Media ended back in June, I’ve been looking around for a new gig by checking various job sites. I’ve been dismayed at how many job descriptions state that you must be in the office and that telecommuters are not invited to apply.

This strikes me as incredibly shortsighted on the part of these companies, particularly if the job in question involves managing online communities or dealing with social media in general. Why on Earth would you hire for a job that requires someone who basically eats, sleeps and breathes online, and then demand they spend part of their time actually going to and from an office instead of being online and in touch with your customers?"

TheCount
Vote Up (9)

I doubt it will have a major impact on other companies.  There are a lot of different opinions about workers telecommuting already. I was reading Slate this morning, and there were two articles in the tech section. One, by Farhad Manjoo, points out that different people work differently, and while some people work more productively in a traditional office, others are more productive working from home. Plus, many other Silicon Valley companies allow telecommuting, so it potentially puts Yahoo at a recruiting disadvantage for top talent. On the other hand, an article by Katie Roiphe that sings the praises of a traditional office work environment.

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