Should companies be allowed to prevent resale of products you purchase?

jackson

Google has made it known loud and clear that if you are one of the people "selected" to spend $1500 on Google Glass, you can't resell them, or apparently even loan them out, without risking having them bricked by Google. There is a book publisher that has a case in front of the Supreme Court that claims people can't legally resale items that are made in another country in the US. Is this a reasonable position for companies to take? I mean, sure they spent money on R&D, printing, etc., but it seems that if I purchase something it is mine, and I should be able to do whatever I want with it.

Topic: Business
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jimlynch
Vote Up (11)

No, they should not. And if they do, don't buy their products. It's that simple.

ttopp
Vote Up (8)

With Google Glass, I think it is different because the initial batch is almost a public beta. I really doubt that this type of restriction will be in place when the product reaches the point where they are widely available for purchase without customers needing to apply for the privilege to buy.  Otherwise, I wouldn't purchase anything that put such a restriction on what I want to do with it, and for those that do I have no problem disregarding those restriction the same way I do when my carrier tells me I can't root my smartphone. 

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