What's your company going to do about March Madness?

landon

It's time for the NCAA basketball tournament, and every year there is a debate on what to do about it. We had a couple people arguing that we "have to" block all tournament content and videos. Others, including myself, took the position that it happens every year, the world doesn't end, business goes on, and we have no complaints about things not getting done, with the exception of one of the same people who wants to block everything, but she gets angry when people talk to each other, so it doesn't take much to set her off. I personally think it give co-workers a chance to share something, most people aren't THAT into it anyway, and the amount of time "wasted" is pretty minimal anyway. Ask around your office and see how many people watched a screaming goat video this month at work. As long as work is done well, I don't really care if there is a screaming vote, sneezing panda or nasty dunk taking place on their screen.

So which approach are you taking: (a) let's see some hoops, or (b) basketball is for unemployed people?

Topic: Business
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becker
Vote Up (8)

I grew up in North Carolina, so I may be a touch biased. In the public schools, our teachers would bring in small TVs during the ACC tourney and leave it on all day with the sound off. I did ok in school, got into a couple decent colleges, and turned out more or less ok. It's a minor thing. Why try to take every bit of joy out of work? Americans already work more than other western countries with less days off. Let people have a little fun. The short answer to your question, as you can probably guess, is that we aren't going to worry about it at my company. Oh, and go Irish!

jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

I have no interest in ball sports, they bore me. So I wouldn't even pay any attention to it, though I'm sure it must be exciting for those who are interested in it. I'd rather read or watch Game of Thrones or something.

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