Who is going to win the big legal battle between Google and Oracle?

dthomas

I feel like I'm watching a very long hockey game between Oracle and Google - big boys playing for big bucks. I think Google is more likely to prevail; Java was promoted like crazy as open source, and Google worked with Sun during the early days of Android development. On the other hand Oracle has a few perfect copy Java APIs that they can show Google used, which only matters if they can show open use of those APIs was not allowed. So, who is most likely to prevail in the patent dispute over Java, Google or Oracle?

Topic: Business
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jimlynch
Vote Up (28)

There was some sort of damning email from a Google developer that seemed to indicate that Oracle might win. Who knows how it will really turn out, they might just settle and call it a day at some point.

See this story:

Why Oracle Believes Google Stole Java for Android Development
http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/Why-Oracle-Believes-Goo...

sspade
Vote Up (23)

 

I think Google is going to win this, at least the first part which deals with copyrights.  I'm not so sure about the patent issues that will be decided in a seperate phase of the trial.  As I understand it, Oracle's copyright case is dependent on Google using 37 API packages that Oracle claims are separate from the rest of Java, and are therefore individually copyrightable.  Google says, nope, you can't use Java without APIs, so Java is useless if you cut out APIs from open source, which would render "open source" meaningless.  Plus, if you listen to Oracle, they make almost everything you do with APIs a derivative work of their specification.

 

And besides, Google argues, even if you could copyright it, we didn't use much of your code anyway.  It's not enough to count, and if it does count, Sun shouldn't get much money.  Having Sun's former CEO who was in charge at the time of Android development come in and basically agree with everything Google said certainly didn't strengthen Oracle's argument.  If I were a betting man, I'd say this round will go to Google.

 

Agili Ron
Vote Up (13)

Hello Friends,

Oracle’s core argument appears to be that Google should have merely obtained a Java license. Perhaps then all of this court nonsense would have been avoided. Still, Google isn’t going down without a fight and, according to Mashable, is continuing to emphasize the point that “infringement and fair use are two sides of the same coin.”
Google is resolute in going forward with a retrial. Their statement to the court makes that very clear. Oracle's patent infringement and copyright lawsuit against Google is finally set to go to trial at the U.S. District Court in San Francisco today, but there are certainly plenty of questions looming as to where this will end up.
But Oracle has also repeatedly failed to pinpoint and narrow down which patents being violated. Furthermore, it hasn't helped that settlement talks have continuously stalled proceedings. Even dragging in Oracle CEO Larry Ellison and Google CEO Larry Page didn't do any good.

Thanks and Regards,
Agili Ron

agiliron.com

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