Will Apple selling its products through big box stores like WalMart damage its brand image?

dthomas

I don't shop at Walmart (see documentary "The High Cost of Low Prices" for an explanation as to some of the reasons why), but I needed a new fishing license and the closest place in the area was the sporting goods section at Walmart. I actually did an as-seen-on-TV double take when I walked by a display case filled with Apple products. When I think of Apple, I think of the slick shopping experience of the Apple store. And actual customer service. And a company that at least pays lip service to social consciousness. I do not think Apple=Walmart. In fact I consider the two to be about as different as two huge companies could be. Will selling Apple products at places like Walmart ultimately damage the brand image of Apple, or am I the only one that sees the dissonance in this?

Topic: Business
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jimlynch
Vote Up (23)

I doubt it will have any negative effect. True Apple fans will no doubt shop at an Apple Store. Some folks live far from those, however. So it's nice for them that they can access Apple products at Walmart stores.

Personally, I prefer ordering from Apple's site more than going to an Apple store or a Walmart. It's just much easier and faster. No crowds and no parking headaches.

jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

I doubt it will have any negative effect. True Apple fans will no doubt shop at an Apple Store. Some folks live far from those, however. So it's nice for them that they can access Apple products at Walmart stores.

Personally, I prefer ordering from Apple's site more than going to an Apple store or a Walmart. It's just much easier and faster. No crowds and no parking headaches.

blackdog
Vote Up (21)

Honestly, it does harm Apple's image in my eyes.  So Apple customers care about Foxconn, but don't mind Walmart?  I'm not saying the comparison is necessarily apples to apples, no pun intended, but it does seem like a bit of a disconnect to me.  But perhaps that's just me.  I honestly doubt most people will care, and those that would probably aren't shopping at Walmart anyway.   

fresko
Vote Up (17)

I for one don`t see any disonance in this. Why would people get confused about the brand image instead of being glad that such amazing products are now more accessible to them, on the shelves of the supermarkets that they visit on a weekly basis. This days, from nowadays on, when I need to buy clothing I will go to WomenSuits and when I need to buy smart techie stuff, I will most certainly go to WalMart.

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