Do you see examples of sexism from programmers in your workplace?

James Gaskin

Interesting question: Does programmer now equal Male Chauvinist Pig?
http://www.itworld.com/software/261076/does-programmer-now-equal-male-ch...

Your thoughts? Experiences?

Topic: Career
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dbrown
Vote Up (11)

Typically, I see the same conversations occurring whether everyone present is all male or male/female mix.  So which is that; an example of conversation free of gender bias, or proof that males are inherently misogynistic?  The "problem" as I perceive it is sometimes the lack of a filter on those topics that I wouldn't want to discuss with my mother.  In addition, the same comment may sound relatively innocent when made by one person, while it sounds creepy when made by another, so individual mannerisms come into play as to how a given statement is perceived.  

 

There can also be a level of hypersensitivity that sees sexism where it doesn't exist.  For example, everyone in my office makes coffee, including me.  Simple rule, bottom of pot, make a new one.  One woman in my office just turns off the coffee maker, and when called out on it complains that "just because I'm a woman doesn't mean I have to make your coffee."  No, it certainly does not.  But when one finds offense in equal treatment, there will never be an environment free of offense.   

jimlynch
Vote Up (10)

People these day have become hyper-sensitive about things. Even innocuous comments can be misconstrued and blown up into a big drama scene. Fortunately there are still some sane people out there who know better, I make it a point to hang out with folks like that and try to ignore the people who are just looking for something to be offended by.

Life is too short to worry too much about things like that. People would be much happier if they adopted a "live and let live" attitude instead of getting into a tizzy every time somebody said something they didn't like.

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