Does being familiar with Python still have any value?

jdixon

I was updating my resume, and removing the useless information to make it less cluttered and (hopefully) more compelling. Does knowing Python still have any value to potential employers? I learned it, oh I don't even know exactly, perhaps 6-7 years ago. I haven't used it in quite a while, but I'm sure I could pick it back up easily enough if I had to. Is it something that I should leave on my resume, or has it just become a space filler?

Tags: python, resume
Topic: Career
Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
blackdog
Vote Up (17)

Sure, Python is still used pretty widely.  I found a list of some of the internet companies that use Python to give you an idea.  Some of these include reddit, Digg, Mozilla, Pinterest (django), and Yelp, among others.  It definitely isn't just a space filler on your resume.  

 

http://www.quora.com/Python-programming-language-1/Which-Internet-compan...

 

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (17)

FWIW, I went to Dice.com, the tech career site, and did a search on Python. I got 3,729 returns. So Python clearly has value to some employers.

 

Also, I found a link to something called the Python Job Board. Hope this helps. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (16)

For some employers, sure. Check around the various job sites, and you'll find quite a few companies that are interested in it. It certainly doesn't hurt to have it as part of your skill set.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Path is clear for approval of H-1B spouse rule, other changes may come too.
IT is out of the backroom and in the front office – so it's time to hire candidates who match that new reality.
From sign-on bonuses to long-term equity bonus incentives to perks such as paying for the lease on a new Tesla, firms are upping the ante to attract and hire elite software development talent in a tight market.
Online test grants LFCS and LFCE certifications.
Reverse mentoring helps senior tech execs brush up on social media, mobile skills.
Ryan Carmack, the 9 year-old son of the famed programmer and game designer, has released Pong-clone called Angry Face
A new study reveals that Java developers make the most while JavaScript programmers are the most wanted
Projects fail, clients move on and layoffs happen. However, you can keep your team motivated.
U.S. technology professionals searching for jobs may want to look in states not normally considered IT hot spots.
NomadList uses crowdsourced data to show which cities in the U.S. and the world are the best - and worst - for remote workers
randomness