Does being familiar with Python still have any value?

jdixon

I was updating my resume, and removing the useless information to make it less cluttered and (hopefully) more compelling. Does knowing Python still have any value to potential employers? I learned it, oh I don't even know exactly, perhaps 6-7 years ago. I haven't used it in quite a while, but I'm sure I could pick it back up easily enough if I had to. Is it something that I should leave on my resume, or has it just become a space filler?

Tags: python, resume
Topic: Career
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Answers

3 total
Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (20)

FWIW, I went to Dice.com, the tech career site, and did a search on Python. I got 3,729 returns. So Python clearly has value to some employers.

 

Also, I found a link to something called the Python Job Board. Hope this helps. 

blackdog
Vote Up (19)

Sure, Python is still used pretty widely.  I found a list of some of the internet companies that use Python to give you an idea.  Some of these include reddit, Digg, Mozilla, Pinterest (django), and Yelp, among others.  It definitely isn't just a space filler on your resume.  

 

http://www.quora.com/Python-programming-language-1/Which-Internet-compan...

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (18)

For some employers, sure. Check around the various job sites, and you'll find quite a few companies that are interested in it. It certainly doesn't hurt to have it as part of your skill set.

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