I feel that with all the credentials I possess I am being underpaid?

Diode

I have about 3 years experience in network security and I am making $25 an hour (Los Angeles, Ca). My official job title is "network security administrator".

 

I possess the following credentials:

 

- comptia project+ certification

- comptia security+ certification

- comptia network+ certification

- associates degree in business management

- associates degree in marketing

- bachelors in design and applied arts

 

I'm thinking it's time to look for new employment as my current employer does not want raise my pay.

What do you guys think? What should I be making with these credentials alone?

 

I'm also working on OSCP certification at the moment.

 

One of the problems i've been running into it is employers low-balling pay. The job market is tough and they know this.

 

Thanks for your help.

Topic: Career
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2 total
landon
Vote Up (6)

Really, the answer to your question is self-evident. If you are being underpaid for a person with you education, experience and abilities, then you will be able to find another position that pays you what you are actually worth. If not, well…..

 

I’m not in CA, so I don’t know the particulars about cost of living and average wages in your field. Your credentials sound solid, but there are many, many people across the country with bachelor degrees and doctorates who are struggling to find jobs. You have three years of experience. That’s next to nothing in the big scheme of things. Because there are, at the moment, more qualified potential employees than positions available it is, unfortunately for you, something of a buyers market as you noted. However, if you are able to show that you are somehow a superior potential employee that the other candidates for a given position, you should have a superior bargaining position when it comes to wages. Look in the local trade pubs and see what range of salaries are offered for equivalent positions. If an employer is unwilling to pay you what you think you are worth, well then, one of you is wrong. If you are confident that the one who is wrong is not you, then you can give your notice and move on to greener pastures. If you are not so certain, well, then, I suspect you will not be as inclined to take a hard line at the bargaining table.

 

Good luck to you. I do not know whether you are being underpaid or not, because I don’t know you or the specifics of your job market. I do know people who have impressive credentials on their resume who are doing worse than you right now.  The thing is, if you truly feel that your employer undervalues you, you will never be happy there, and every day that you go into work you will feel resentment. You need to resolve that, one way or another.

jimlynch
Vote Up (5)

You might want to check Glassdoor to find other companies in your area and see how much they are paying for similar positions.

http://www.glassdoor.com

" Glassdoor is a free jobs and career community that offers the world an inside look at jobs and companies. What sets us apart is our "employee generated content" – anonymous salaries, company reviews, interview questions, and more – all posted by employees, job seekers, and sometimes the companies themselves. Now with nearly 3 million salaries and reviews, you have all the information you might need to make your next career decision.

Plus, with Glassdoor's proprietary JobScope™ technology, job seekers have a new way to browse job listings and get instant, in-depth details for any job listing. We take job seekers beyond the information provided in your typical job description by seamlessly integrating salaries and reviews posted by employees, as well uncovering any Inside Connections™ they may have through their friends on Facebook. If our own content isn't enough information to help your with your decision, hopefully we can get you to a friend or friend-of-friend that will be able to answer your questions.

No other career or jobs site offers such detailed information about specific jobs at specific companies – all for free. "

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