Is the paper resume dead?

merry

What's the best way to send in a resume, and what tools are companies using to filter/hone in on the best candidates?

Tags: jobs
Topic: Career
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jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

The WSJ had an interesting article about this. It seems that more and more companies don't consider paper resumes to be enough any more. They want video, social media profiles and other data to form an opinion about a job candidate.

So I think we're seeing a sea change in how companies will screen potential candidates. This means that people will have to learn video interview skills, and they will have to be careful about what they post online (especially on social media sites).

Younger folks should take heed of this and be very careful what they say and what kind of information they share about themselves. Companies will no doubt use Google and other search engines to try to find background information about potential employees.

Here's a link to the WSJ article:

No More Résumés, Say Some Firms
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405297020375040457717303199181489...

"Companies are increasingly relying on social networks such as LinkedIn, video profiles and online quizzes to gauge candidates' suitability for a job. While most still request a résumé as part of the application package, some are bypassing the staid requirement altogether.

A résumé doesn't provide much depth about a candidate, says Christina Cacioppo, an associate at Union Square Ventures who blogs about the hiring process on the company's website and was herself hired after she compiled a profile comprising her personal blog, Twitter feed, LinkedIn profile, and links to social-media sites Delicious and Dopplr, which showed places where she had traveled."

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