Would it be beneficial to add a QR code to your resume?

sspade

I read about the CEO of Vizibility advocating for the inclusion of QR codes on your resume. In his view, it will show that you are a tech savvy prospect, and allow you to direct. I'm not so sure, I think it could be a bit too gimmicky. How would you react to a resume with a QR code?

Topic: Career
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (24)

It seems a bit gimmicky to me, frankly. I could be wrong though, so perhaps it might be a good idea to investigate the company you want to work for and see if it's something they might appreciate. A little research beforehand might save you some time later on when you actually go to submit your resume.

bcastle
Vote Up (21)

Well, I certainly would not include it if I was interested in a security oriented position.  And from the hiring standpoint I wouldn't just scan it willy-nilly if the resume crossed my desk.  Sure, the risk is small, but it would be absurd to ignore the fact that QR codes can be an attack vector.  I would give the person a little credit for being original though, or at least I would have until I read this question.  Now I would just ask him/her if they cribbed the idea from ITWorld.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Path is clear for approval of H-1B spouse rule, other changes may come too.
IT is out of the backroom and in the front office – so it's time to hire candidates who match that new reality.
From sign-on bonuses to long-term equity bonus incentives to perks such as paying for the lease on a new Tesla, firms are upping the ante to attract and hire elite software development talent in a tight market.
Online test grants LFCS and LFCE certifications.
Reverse mentoring helps senior tech execs brush up on social media, mobile skills.
Ryan Carmack, the 9 year-old son of the famed programmer and game designer, has released Pong-clone called Angry Face
A new study reveals that Java developers make the most while JavaScript programmers are the most wanted
Projects fail, clients move on and layoffs happen. However, you can keep your team motivated.
U.S. technology professionals searching for jobs may want to look in states not normally considered IT hot spots.
NomadList uses crowdsourced data to show which cities in the U.S. and the world are the best - and worst - for remote workers
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+